Sunday, January 9, 2011

Culture as a Dimension of Development: The Case of Bali, Indonesia

By Camden Conference | Jan 09, 2011
(Courtesy of: Camden Conference)

The dimension of culture is vital in Asian history and development. When cultural traditions are ignored or undervalued, the results may bring outcomes not intended by experts or leaders directing economic or political planning. When appreciated as a fact of social life, culture may contribute powerfully to the analysis of what will succeed in an Asian setting.

Join cultural anthropologist Dr. Phil McKean for a discussion of modernization efforts in Bali, Indonesia, including the “green revolution” in the irrigated rice fields, and the growth of international “cultural tourism.” This event takes place on Sunday, January 16, from 3:00 – 4:30 PM at the Cushing Public Library and is free and open to all.

Dr. McKean will explore how an appreciation of culture can bring a deeper understanding of the changes in Bali in the past several decades in such important areas as sustainable agriculture for growing populations, and the retention of local and regional identity in the face of global communications. He may even conjure some suggestions for future U.S. policy towards the societies of Asia.

Phil McKean has taught at Hampshire College, Brown and Udayana Universities, and Coastal Senior College. His Ph.D. is in Cultural Anthropology, based on his research in Bali. He lives in Cushing with his wife, Deborah.

This community event is hosted by the Cushing Public Library in anticipation of the 24th Annual Camden Conference: “The Challenges of Asia,” February 18-20, 2011. For more information on this event, please call the Library directly at 207-354-7212.

The Camden Conference is a nonprofit, non-partisan educational organization whose mission is to foster informed discourse on world affairs through year-round community events, public and student engagement, and an annual weekend Conference featuring distinguished speakers focusing on a central theme related to U.S. foreign affairs. For more information, please visit or call 236-1034.

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